How to Answer Priority and Delegation NCLEX Questions

Everytime I see one of these questions, I want to pull my hair out! They intimidate me and I often feel the least prepared for these types of questions. Here I will break down how to answer NCLEX-style priority and delegation questions.

A lot of this material comes from the Saunder’s Comprehensive NCLEX Review💎. If you’ve seen any of my other posts, you have probably run across this book. I wish I would have purchased this book my first semester of school. I bought it my third semester and kicked myself for not getting it sooner. It has been worth every penny to me!

Another great resource is the Brilliant Nurse💎 Course for NCLEX prep. It has practice questions, detailed rationales, videos, strategy sessions, and case studies. The prices are very competitive with other similar online NCLEX-prep websites.

Priority

Prioritizing patient care is an essential nursing skill. It will determine who gets care first, and the order in which you perform your tasks. Often in the clinical setting, it can be easier to spot your priorities because you have access to a lot of information. NCLEX-style questions can be tough simply because you are given 1-2 sentences of limited information with which you must make the decision.

These types of questions can be multiple choice, select all that apply, ordered response, exhibit questions, etc. Any type of question is game!

Priority Guidelines

  • ABC’s – Airway, Breathing, Circulation
  • Remember Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
  • Consult your patients about their priorities and needs
  • Use the nursing process to guide you

When you are given a set of choices, read them all before making your decision. Hopefully you can eliminate 1-2 choices right off the bat. After that, use your ABC’s. If any answer choices fall into that, it is probably your answer.

Delegation

The key to answering delegation questions is understanding the scope of practice for yourself and each of your colleagues. You must also analyze the tasks that need to be done and the importance of completing them. Then, assign tasks to a competent individual.

When you assign a task to someone else, the nurse who owns the task is accountable for it.

Always ensure patient safety when delegating tasks. In general, non-invasive interventions such as ambulation and hygiene measures can be delegated to UAP’s (Unlicensed Assistive Personnel). An LPN or LVN can do some invasive procedures such as catheterization and suctioning.

Remember that a Registered Nurse is responsible for assessment, planning care, initiating teaching, and administering medications intravenously.

Never assign an unstable patient to UAP’s or LVN’s.

I hope this helps explain how to approach these questions! Practice makes perfect. Use one of the resources listed above to do practice questions! The more you expose yourself to these tough questions, the better you will get at it!


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How to Study Health Assessment in Nursing School

Assessment is one of the skills that set you apart from a lot of other medical careers. CNA’s, MA’s, Techs, and other UAP’s do not have the assessment skills that registered nurses have. It is one of those skills that is pounded in nursing school, but never truly mastered until years and years of practice. This guide will hopefully give you a better idea of how to study Assessment in Nursing School and answer HESI and NCLEX style questions.

Your textbook may be different, but we used Jarvis’s Physical Examination and Health Assessment, 7th ed.💎

Anatomy & Physiology

Most programs in the United States require A&P I and II. I’ve rarely seen some programs squish all of that in one class. You need to be a master at your anatomy and physiology. Review cardiopulmonary, abdomen, and neuro anatomy before school starts. You will need to be able to pretty much label and/or draw from memory most of your body systems. A lot of people in my class had trouble with Assessment most likely because they were weak in anatomy. I personally had trouble with the cardiovascular system for this very reason.

Vocabulary

There will be a lot of big medical terms that you’ll need to know! Hopefully you’ve picked up a lot from A&P, Patho, and your other Biology classes. When you study, make flashcards of all of the terms you do not know and study them every single day. These words WILL be on your exams, HESI, and NCLEX. Learn them now.

Normal vs. Abnormal

Assessment is all about knowing what you are supposed to be seeing, hearing, and feeling (namely inspecting, auscultating, and palpating). Establishing this foundation is very important! I took notes in two columns. One side was “normal” findings, and the other side was “abnormal” findings.

In your practice, you should be able to tell when something is wrong. You may not know 100% what is going on, but you should be able to tell your doctor over the phone what your findings are.

Study Habits + Repetition

Assessment is a tough subject. It is a lot to chew, especially with your other classes. You need to establish excellent study habits. This means no more going out every weekend, no more binge watching TV. You gotta get up earlier and go to bed later. Check out my Top 10 Study Tips to get some more tips on how to establish excellent study habits!⬇️

Repetition is key with Assessment. I probably studied each set of material more than ten times. I rewrote notes, drew pictures, and answered plenty of practice questions. I made it a goal to know the material inside and out. I probably spent the most amount of time studying for the class during my first semester.

Practice

As much fun reading out of a book is, nursing isn’t all about reading a patient’s chart. You need to practice! Practice on everyone that will let you. Friends, family, strangers (JK, that might be weird). Get used to going through your full head to toe on different people. Talk through your assessment, even if the other person has no idea what you’re saying!

Patience

These skills will come to you. Like I said in the beginning, you will not master these skills until you’ve been in practice for a long time. Don’t be too hard on yourself and don’t be afraid to seek help! As always, I am here to answer your questions!



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Acid-Base Imbalance Chart

Respiratory Acidosis Metabolic Acidosis Respiratory Alkalosis Metabolic Alkalosis
Causes Depression of the respiratory center (brainstem trauma, over-sedation), respiratory muscle paralysis, disorders of the chest wall, disorders of the lung parenchyma, hypoventilation Lactic acidosis, renal failure, diabetic ketoacidosis, diarrhea High altitudes, hypermetabolic states such as fever, anemia and thyrotoxicosis, early salicylate intoxication, anxiety or panic disorder, improper use of mechanical ventilations Prolonged vomiting, gastric suctioning, excessive HCO3- intake, hyperaldosteronism with hypokalemia, diuretic therapy
pH < 7.35 < 7.35 > 7.45 > 7.45
CO2 Hypercapnia   Hypocapnia, CO2 < 38mmHg  
HCO3-   HCO3- < 24 mEq/L   HCO3- > 26 mEq/L
Compensation Not as effective since kidneys take time, but conserve bicarbonate and eliminate H+ Hyperventilation and renal excretion of excess acids Kidneys decrease H+ excretion and HCO3- absorption Hypoventilation, kidneys conserve H+ and eliminate HCO3-
Manifestations Headache, restlessness, blurred vision, apprehension, lethargy, muscle twitching, tremors, convulsions, coma Headache, lethargy, Kussmaul respirations Dizziness, confusion, tingling extremities, convulsions, coma with sigs of hypocalcemia Weakness, muscle cramps, hyperactive reflexes, hypocalcemia
Treatment Restore adequate ventilation, mechanical ventilation may be required, IV lactate HCO3-, lactate (converted to HCO3- in the liver), treat underlying causes Paper bag, treat hypoxemia and hypermetabolic states NaCl, K+, Chloride IV (Cl replaces HCO3-)

Source: Medical-Surgical Nursing : Assessment and Management of Clinical Problems, 10th Ed (Lewis)💎


Brilliant Nurse NCLEX-RN® Test Prep! 💎

FIVE Things I’ve Learned Working in the Emergency Department

1. Staying on Task

The first few months of working as an intern, I found myself just running around with my head cut off with no sense of direction. I have (mostly) learned the art of writing things down and setting alarms on my watch. I no longer hesitate to delegate to our awesome, amazing, wonderful tech’s. I can methodically organize tasks by patient priority. It feels less chaotic for me! I try to go through four “steps” for each patient:

  1. Initial assessment/ABC’s/Intake
  2. Orders
  3. Maintenance/Repeat Labs/Comfort
  4. Discharge/Transport

I like to write the word “comfort” near the middle of my chicken scratch report sheet. Although not a priority in the emergency room, sometimes getting that patient an extra warm blanket can ease them up and give you time to handle another patient.

2. Using SBAR to Talk to Doctors

Before this job, I had never actually done this. They teach it to us all the time in school but I have always been afraid to do it. My tip? I write down my talking points. Each phone call has gotten smoother, and I usually get what I need for my patients!

An example of my talking points:

S- Mr. X, the 80 y/o male in room 16 who is here for respiratory distress now has an O2 sat of 87% 30 min after the breathing treatment

B- He has a history of HTN and type 2 diabetes

A- BP 142/88, RR 30, HR 94, SpO2 87% on 6LNC, no temp. bibasilar crackles

R- I recommend another breathing treatment and a stat chest x-ray

In school, I felt like they teach us to include everything in our SBAR. There are a lot of situations that would warrant a more thorough SBAR (like giving report to the floor nurse). But when something is needed very quickly in the emergency department, you have to just grab the basics (ABC’s) and run with it.

3. Hospice/Palliative care.

Some of you might be wondering why this is happening in the emergency department. Well you know what. The situation warranted it. We are often on saturation, which means no where else for this family to go for several hours to days. I’ve cried with the families that are waiting for a room somewhere else. I sat with them and ignored the noise and chaos down the hall. I took extra time with the extremely uncomfortable patient to make sure the bed was made perfectly, all trash was picked up, and that the family always had fresh ice water. 

When that family makes a decision for their loved one to be DNR, and we cannot get them a room upstairs, the emergency department becomes the place where the family must start the process of grieving.

4. Confidently Asking for Help

Instead of saying, “I don’t know what I’m doing,” or, “I’m really sucking today,” I say, “Hey, it’s time for morphine, could you pull that for me please?” and “Could you please page respiratory?” My preceptor knows my limits, and I am finally feeling like a real nurse.

Negative self-talk can really hinder your day. I don’t know what I’m doing all the time. But I already know that and I don’t need to bring myself down because of it. I also use statements like, “Could we review this process? I think I misunderstood something.”

ALL. NURSES. NEED. HELP.

If your preceptor says they never ask for help, they are doing their job wrong.

5. Targeted Patient Education.

How often have I ever stopped to thoroughly explain something to a patient? Never in my clinicals, honestly. My preceptor usually does it. And in the ED, it isn’t at the top of the priority list. Patient education does not have to be some crazy 30 minute presentation! I can explain insulin and blood sugar during times of illness. I can explain a sliding scale. And I can do it in about three minutes. So yes, that sounds so simple, but I’ve always been afraid to take that initiative!


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Emergency Room Essentials

I know what you’re thinking – there’s no such thing as a “typical” day in the ED. In fact, the only thing you can rely on is that your day will be unpredictable. As a nurse intern in a busy adult ED, I have quickly figured out which items are essential during my shift, and which ones I really do not need. I do not currently work in a trauma center–we see most of the city’s STEMI’s, CVA’s, and transplant patients. We also see minor fractures, lacerations, dislocations, etc.

Our ED is divided into “Stations,” and each station has somewhat of a different category of patients. The “front rooms” are the most critical, we have a special room for eye trauma, and we have about 40 beds.

My job as a student intern involves shadowing/helping an Emergency Room RN. I’ve gotten to the point now where I am a helpful partner to my preceptor. When we get a new patient, I know exactly what my role is!

My first day, I showed up with a pocket full of extra supplies that only weighed me down throughout the day. I’ve narrowed down my everyday essentials to just 7 items!

  1. Stethoscope. My beautiful Littman III Classic in matte black is my closest friend in the ED. When assessing ABC’s, lung sounds can give you a clue as to what someone’s respiratory status is. It also isn’t uncommon to uncover distant heart sounds indicating cardiac tamponade.
  2. Retractable badge Sharpie. This is my second most used item! It takes out the possibility of setting your pen/marker down somewhere and losing it forever. I use it to label lines, specimen tags, patient belongings, sign EMS handoff, write down vitals on my glove, and the list goes on.
  3. Pen light. Neuro checks are important for ANY type of patient. If a patient comes in with a sprained ankle, I still do a neuro check. No matter what the patient tells you, they could be making something up because they don’t remember what happened. I also use my pen light for Foley placements and quick airway checks.
  4. Trauma shears. Mine can cut through thick leather! Although we are not a trauma center, I have still cut my fair share of clothing. It is also useful for cutting tape, medication packaging, and during wound care.
  5. Saline flushes. Not something you bring from home, but I always grab a handful at the beginning of my shift. You’ll find that you always need one or two when your hands are already full doing something else.
  6. White board marker. Our rooms are supposed to have their own whiteboard markers. We all know this doesn’t happen. Updating the boards aren’t necessarily the top priority, but I try to update them when I can. It helps patients feel more comfortable if they know the names of their care team.
  7. Black pen. This is probably my least used item, and I often lose it, but it’s good to have!

I hope this can help some of my fellow students. I was so nervous on my first ED shift and I had no idea what I would need! I ended up filling my pockets with 4 pens, a small notebook, and all of my other regular clinical supplies. It was just too much.



Brilliant Nurse NCLEX-RN® Test Prep!💎

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Top 10 Study Tips!

1. Make a study schedule and stick to it.

2. Pace yourself. Study every day, even if it’s just for 30 minutes.

3. If you don’t understand something, find a different resource (ask a friend, find a YouTube video, email the instructor, etc.).

4. Study for 50 minutes at a time and take a 10-15 minute break in between.

5. During those breaks, don’t just be on your phone or computer. Get up. Move around. Get your blood flowing!

6. Make time for yourself. If you like to read leisurely, do it. If you work out, do it.

7. SLEEP. for the love of God. Get 7-9 hours of sleep a night.

8. Find a method that works for you. Flashcards, outlines, Quizlet, recording yourself, drawing pictures, etc. It’s all trial and error.

My less than artistic attempt at understanding the cardiac system.

9. DON’T CRAM. If you don’t know the material the night before the test, chances are you won’t know it for the test.

10. Studies show that you need to review material 7 times to retain 90% of the information.


Brilliant Nurse NCLEX-RN® Test Prep!💎

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Pharmacology: Seizures and Epilepsy

Definitions:

Convulsion: abnormal motor phenomena (jerking, movements, tics, rigors)
Seizure: a sudden, excessive synchronous electrical discharge of neurons in the brain that can spread to other foci
Epilepsy: group of chronic neurological disorders characterized by recurring seizures

Main Types of Seizures:

Simple Partial: discrete motor, sensory, autonomic and psychoillusionry symptoms. No loss of consciousness. Persists 20-30 seconds.
Tonic-Clonic: major convulsions characterized by a period of muscle rigidity (tonic phase) followed by synchronous muscle jerks (clonic phase). Immediate loss of consciousness. Followed by postictal state. Lasts 90 seconds or less.

Therapeutic Goals:

  • Enable patient to live a normal life.
  • Ideally eliminate seizures, but may not be possible

How do Anti-Epileptic Drugs Work?

  • suppress discharge of neurons within a seizure focus
  • suppress the spread of seizure activity from the focus to other areas of the brain
  • decrease in sodium influx, decrease in calcium influx, increase in potassium influx

Traditional AED’s

  • Phenytoin (Dilantin): Therapeutic range: 10-20mcg/mL, can cause gingival hyperplasia and nystagmus
  • Carbamazepine (Tegretol): Also treats trigeminal neuralgia and bipolar disorder. Contraindicated if patient has bone marrow depression or hypersensitivity. Avoid grapefruit juice!
  • Valproic Acid (Depakote): Also treats migraines and bipolar disorder. Therapeutic range: 50-100mcg/mL. Highly teratogenic! Can cause hepatotoxicity, pancreatitis and hypersensitivity.
  • Ethosuximide (Zarontin): Treats absence seizures. Therapeutic range: 40-100mcg/mL. Generally devoid of adverse effects.
  • Phenobarbital: Older drug, long-acting. Toxicity can cause nystagmus and ataxia. Overdose can cause respiratory depression and possibly death. Has a sedative effect, cognitive/learning impairment, CNS depression and drug dependence. May make children hyper.

Status Epilepticus

A MEDICAL EMERGENCY in which a patient is continually having tonic-clonic seizures for 20-30 minutes and is not conscious the whole time.

Immediate treatment includes: turning patient to the side, administering oxygen, removing objects that could potentially harm, having padded bedrails, suction secretions, and DO NOT restrain the patient or put anything in their mouth. Administer one of the following medications:

  • Diazepam (Valium): Used for emergency treatment of status epilepticus. Short half-life. May develop physical dependence and withdrawal symptoms.
  • Lorazepam (Ativan): Drug of choice used in status epilepticus because of prolonged effects. A rectal gel is available for out of hospital use.

Source: Lehne Pharmacology for Nursing Care, 9th Edition, Chapter 24💎



Pharmacology: Parkinson’s Disease Quick Sheet

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a chronic and progressive movement disorder, meaning that symptoms continue and worsen over time. Nearly one million people in the US are living with Parkinson’s disease. The cause is unknown, and although there is presently no cure, there are treatment options such as medication and surgery to manage its symptoms.

Parkinson’s Disease Foundation, 2016

Parkinson’s Disease:

  • Idiopathic degenerative disorder of CNS from loss of dopamine-secreting neurons in the substantia nigra
  • – Clinical presentation: resting tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, postural disturbances
  • Therapeutic goals: Improve ADL’s

Dopaminergic Drugs:

  • Activates dopamine receptors, increase dopamine levels, inhibit actions of ACH
  • LEVODOPA: metabolic precursor of dopamine that crosses the BBB, converted to dopamine once in the brain. Disappointing long term effects such as “wearing-off” and “on-off” phenomenon. 2% reaches the brain
  • CARBIDOPA-LEVODOPA: carbidopa prevents levodopa from getting destroyed by decarboxylase enzymes in the peripheral blood. Allows for lower dose of levodopa and less side effects
  • Major side effects: N/V, dyskinesias, orthostatic hypotension

Anticholinergic Drugs:

  • Decreases effects of ACH
  • Can reduce tremor, possibly rigidity, but not bradykinesia
  • Less effective than dopaminergic drugs
  • Most used: BENZOTROPINE (COGENTIN) and TRIHEXYPHENIDYL (ARTANE)
  • Major side effects: dry mouth, blurred vision, tachycardia, constipation, urinary retention, decreased sweating, increased body temp

COMT Inhibitors

  • inhibit metabolism of levodopa in the periphery
  • have no therapeutic effects of their own
  • ENTACAPONE and TOLCAPONE

MAO-B Inhibitors

  • inhibit inactivation of dopamine in the brain
  • when combined with levodopa, can reduce “wearing off” effect
  • SELEGILLINE (ELDEPRYL)

Source: Lehne’s Pharmacology for Nursing Care, 9th Edition. Burchum and Rosenthal, Chapter 21.💎 | Medical-Surgical Nursing : Assessment and Management of Clinical Problems, 10th Ed (Lewis)💎



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NCLEX Review: Fluid and Electrolytes

Sodium (135-145 mEq/L)

  • The major cation in the ECF. It has a water retaining effect. When there is excess Na+ in the ECF, more water will be reabsorbed by the kidneys.
  • Functions: maintains body fluids, conduction of neuromuscular impulses via pump, regulates acid-base balance by combining with Cl- or HCO3-.

Hyponatremia

  • Causes: vomiting, diarrhea, NG suction, excessive perspiration, kidney disease, water intoxication, IV D5W, SIADH, burns
  • Signs and Symptoms: apprehension, muscular weakness, postural hypotension, N/V, dry mucous membranes, tachycardia
  • Treatment: water restriction, normal saline IV

Hypernatremia

  • Causes: excessive salt intake, dehydration, CHF, hepatic failure (excess aldosterone secretion), diabetes insipidus
  • Signs and Symptoms: extreme thirst, sticky mucous membranes, dry tongue, fever, postural hypotension, restlessness/agitation/irritability, increased fluid retention/edema, decreased urine output, convulsions
  • Treatment: stop IV normal saline, replace water loss

Potassium (3.5-5.0 mEq/L)

  • The major ICF electrolyte, 80%-90% is excreted by the kidneys.
  • When tissue breaks down, K+ leaves the cells and enters the ECF and is excreted by the kidneys
  • The body does not conserve K+
  • Influences both skeletal and cardiac muscle activity

Hypokalemia

  • ** The most common electrolyte imbalance
  • Causes: vomiting/diarrhea, renal disorder, sweating, crash diets, diuretics
  • S/S: fatigue, anorexia, N/V, muscle weakness, decreased bowel motility, cardiac dysrhythmias, paresthesia or tender muscles
  • Treatment: administer KCl (never give K+ undiluted or IV push. concentrated solutions should be administered through central veins. Use IV pump!)

Hyperkalemia

  • Causes: renal failure, potassium supplements, digoxin toxicity, potassium sparing diuretics, acidosis (DKA), fluid volume deficit. 
  • S/S: anxiety, cardiac arrhythmias (bradycardia, heart block, peaked T wave, widened QRS), muscle weakness, abdominal cramps, diarrhea
  • Treatment: dialysis, Kayexalate, stop supplements

Calcium (4.5-5.3 mg/dL)

  • Ionized (free Calcium) is Calcium not attached to proteins.
  • 99% is located in skeletal system, 1% in serum
  • Necessary for bone and teeth formation
  • Necessary for the transmission of nerve impulses and contraction of the myocardium and skeletal muscles
  • Causes blood clotting by converting prothrombin into thrombin
  • Strengthens capillary membranes

Hypocalcemia

  • Causes: lack of Ca and Vit D in diet, extensive infection, hypoparathyroidism, pancreatitis, chronic renal failure (Phosphorus rises/calcium declines)
  • S/S: Related to diminished neuromuscular and cardiac function – positive Trousseau’s sign, positive Chvostek’s sign, numbness of fingers and around mouth, hyperactive reflexes, tetany, convulsion, spasms/muscle cramps, arrhythmia/ventricular tachycardia. (CATS: convulsions, arrhythmias, tetany, spasms)
  • Treatment: Oral/IV replacement, correct underlying cause

Hypercalcemia

  • Causes: hyperparathyroidism, neoplasm, osteoporosis, prolonged immobilization
  • S/S: anorexia, N/V, lethargy, flank pain from kidney stones, cardiac arrhythmias (heart block, eventual cardiac arrest), muscle flaccidity
  • Treatment: Calcitonin, discontinue antacids, treatment of underlying cause

Phosphate (2.7-4.5 mg/dL)

  • buffer found primarily in ICF
  • functions: acid-base regulation, phosphate and calcium help with bone and teeth development, promotes normal neuromuscular action and participates in CHO metabolism, conversion of glycogen to glucose
  • normally absorbed in the GI tract, regulated by diet, renal excretion, intestinal absorption and PTH

Hypophosphatemia

  • Cause: excretion
  • Symptoms: disorientation, bruising, numbness, bone pain, muscle weakness
  • Treatment: increase dietary intake, IV replacement

Hyperphosphatemia

  • Causes: decreased intake or increased excretion
  • S/S: same as hypocalcemia
  • Treatment: limit phosphate intake, administer aluminum-based antacids.

Chloride (98-106 mEq/L)

  • anion found mostly in ECF, maintains body water balance, plays a role in acid-base balance, combines with H+ to produce acidity in the stomach
  • follows Na+ up or down

Hypochloremia

  • Causes: vomiting, diarrhea, excessive NG drainage, hypokalemia, hyponatremia, adrenal gland deficiency
  • S/S: hyperexcitabilty of the nervous system and muscles, tetany
  • Treatment: treat underlying cause

Hyperchloremia

  • Causes: dehydration, hypernatremia, kidney dysfunction, head injury, hyperparathyroidism
  • S/S: deep, rapid, vigorous breathing, lethargy, weakness
  • Treatment: decrease intake, correct underlying cause

Magnesium (1.5-2.5 mEq/L)

  • Most plentiful in the cells
  • Needed for neuromuscular activity
  • Responsible for the transport of Na and K across the cell membrane

Hypomagnesemia

  • Causes: protein malnutrition, alcoholism/cirrhosis of the liver, aldosterone excess, inadequate absorption (chronic diarrhea, vomiting, NG drainage)
  • S/S: muscle tremors, hyperactive tendon reflexes, confusion, tachycardia
  • Treatment: treat underlying causes, IV replacement if necessary.

Hypermagnesemia

  • Causes: severe dehydration, renal failure, leukemia, antacids/laxatives
  • S/S: flushing, muscular weakness, increased perspiration, cardiac arrhythmias (bradycardia, prolonged QT intervals, AV block)
  • Treatment: treat underlying cause

Helpful Tidbits

  • 4 electrolytes that impact cardiac functioning: K, Mg, Ca, Ph
  • 3 imbalances that contribute to digoxin toxicity: hypokalemia, hypercalcemia, hypomagnesmia
  • 4 imbalances that contribute to seizures: hyponatremia, hypocalcemia, hypomagnesmia, hyperphosphatemia
  • Electrolytes associated with alkalosis: hypomagnesemia, hypokalemia
  • Clinical Dehydration = ECV Deficit + Hypernatremia

Source: Texas Woman’s University College of Nursing, Fundamentals of Nursing – Perry & Potter 2016💎




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Nursing Student Summer Tips!

Off for the summer? Here are some productive things you can do! ⛱🌻

1. Do practice NCLEX questions. Yawn. Who wants to do work over the summer? Start by setting a small goal such as 10 questions/day. You’ll find that it won’t take up too much of your time! By the time summer is over, you’ll have done hundreds of questions. I use Saunder’s NCLEX-RN Comprehensive Review for every class and it works wonders! Get a copy of it here💎!

You can also use Brilliant Nurse NCLEX-RN® Test Prep!💎, which is an online interactive experience to prep you for the NCLEX!

2. Update your resume. This can be difficult during the busy school year! Take some time to really go through your resume and send it to a few trusty people for advice.

3. Look for internships and jobs. Set aside some time to gather up information about internships and jobs. Apply for what you can and get your name out there! What is your ideal unit? What is your ideal salary? 

4. Review tough topics. Did you have a hard time with the endocrine system? Cardiac? Psych? You’re not alone. Look over some of these topics in a stress-free environment. No pressure, no due dates, no exams! You may remember more material this way. Go with 20 minutes a few times a week.

5. Relaxxxxxx. You’ve been working so hard. Plan time to treat yo self! 

Happy Summer!⭐️⛱



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